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Encyclopedia of Rumrunners and Speakeasies: Freeport During Prohibition: M

Mango, Tony

Tony Mango of Alexander Avenue was arrested and charged with possessing intoxicating liquors in February 1925.

Source:

"2 Freeport Liquor Raids." The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 14, 1925, 3. Accessed December 8, 2017. https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/59854833/?terms=%22freeport%2Bliquor%22~10.

Researched by Regina G. Feeney, December 8, 2017.

Maureen (Ship)

Maureen was a rumrunner built in 1931 by the Freeport Point Shipyard.  The Maureen was able to avoid capture for the rest of Prohibition. In 1935, two years after Prohibition’s repeal, Maureen's sister ship, the Mona Lola, grounded at Jones Beach; this mishap left between 800 and 1,500 cases of Cuban liquor strewn along the beach.

Click here for images of the Maureen.

See Also:

Mona-Lola

Sources:

Scopinich, Jr. Fred, "Memories of Freeport's Waterfront" [Part II]. The Leader. August 9, 2007. Accessed October 9, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071065/2007-08-09/ed-1/seq-8/.

Scopinich, Jr. Fred,“Memories of Freeport’s Waterfront” [Part III]. The Leader. August 16, 2007. Accessed October 11, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071065/2007-08-16/ed-1/seq-15/.

Researched by Regina G. Feeney, January 8, 2020.

 

 

Milo, Henry

Henry "Hank" Milo managed one of the first liquor stores in Freeport to receive a license from the Nassau County Alcoholic Beverage Control Board after the repeal of Prohibition.  His store was located at 33 South Grove Street (now Guy Lombardo Avenue).

Sources:

"80 Permits Given to Sell In Nassau." The Nassau Daily Review. December 6, 1933, 1.  Accessed August 21, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071428/1933-12-06/ed-1/seq-1/.

Hank Milo's liquor store [advertisement]. The Nassau Daily Review. June 8, 1934, 24. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071428/1934-06-08/ed-1/seq-24/.

Researched by Regina G. Feeney, August 21, 2019.

Mona-Lola (Ship)

Mona-Lola was the sister ship of the rum runner Maureen. Both ships were built by the Freeport Point Shipyard.During Prohibition, the Mona-Lola had been seized by the government. In February 1935, two years after Prohibition had ended, the Mona-Lola ran ashore which left between 800 and 1,500 cases of Cuban liquor strewn along the beach. Police patrolled the beach to prevent local citizens from helping themselves to the alcohol.  It was reported that Charles D. Combs of 203 Sportsman Avenue and three others went to the authorities at Jones Beach looking for help.  The soaked crew was given food and dry clothes and were later driven to the train station in Wantagh.  Realizing later that the men were connected to the ship filled with contraband, they arrested Combs in Freeport.

See Also:

Maureen

Sources:

"Cops Nam Rum Boat Tar Who Fooled Them." Daily News.  February 4, 1935, 27. Accessed February 5, 2019. Newspapers.com.

"Mona Lola Rum Cargo Is Piling Up on Beach." The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 3, 1935, 1.  Accessed February 3, 2019. https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/52833723/?terms=mona%2Blola.

Scopinich, Jr. Fred, "Memories of Freeport's Waterfront" [Part II]. The Leader. August 9, 2007. Accessed October 9, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071065/2007-08-09/ed-1/seq-8/.

Scopinich, Jr. Fred,“Memories of Freeport’s Waterfront” [Part III]. The Leader. August 16, 2007. Accessed October 11, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071065/2007-08-16/ed-1/seq-15/.

Researched by Regina G. Feeney, February 3, 2019.

Updated by Regina G. Feeney, May 4, 2020.