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Local History Resources: Timeline - Freeport Public Schools

1820 circa

  • Freeport's first public school started in a one room school house located at the north end of the triangle formed by the intersection of Main and Church Streets

1821

  • 37 students attended school six days a week. On Sundays, the Presbyterian Church held religious services in the school building

1843 circa

  • Professor McGee introduced grammar, geography, natural philosophy and an advancement in mathematics. He also introduced the blackboard

1850 circa

  • A new one-story school building was constructed on Main Street's west side, slightly north of Merrick Road

1852

  • After repeated and unsuccessful attempts to get a bigger school built, a few local residents took matters into their own hands and demolished the old building. While the new school was being constructed, the district rented space from Andy Rhodes' wagon shop for three months. Rhodes was paid $8. The original building was sold to Mr. Daniel Ellison for $50.

1853

  • 203 students enrolled. Total expenses for the year: $414.63

1875

  • New building on the northwest corner of Pine Street and Grove Street is constructed for $3,858.75. Old structure is sold for $750

1877 circa

  • Uniform system of textbooks introduced
  • 1877 - NYS Governor Lucius Robinson vetoed a bill permitting women to serve as school officers. Robinson claimed that "the God of nature has appointed different fields of labor, duty and usefulness for the sexes."

Source:

Welch, Gaylynn. "Suffrage at the School Door." New York History Journal. Summer/Fall, 2017, (Vol. 98, No. 3/4), 329-342.

1880

  • 1880 - NYS Governor Alonzo B. Cornell and the NYS legislature allowed women to vote in school elections and hold offices on school boards

Source:

Welch, Gaylynn. "Suffrage at the School Door." New York History Journal. Summer/Fall, 2017, (Vol. 98, No. 3/4), 329-342.

1885

  • Caroline G. Atkinson hired as Freeport's fourth teacher (in addition to L. M. Burdick, Phebe Tice, and Louise J. Carpenter). Ms. Atkinson was a graduate of Albany Normal School (University at Albany)
  • Thomas H. Wheeler becomes a teacher in the Freeport School around 1858

See Also:

Wheeler, Thomas H.

1888

1890 circa

1890

  • (October 7) A motion was passed changing the District School to a Union Free School

1892

  • Enrollment reached 528. Charles W. Oley became principal

1893

  • (January 10) Wooden school house destroyed by fire
  • (July 2) A cornerstone laid to kick off the construction of a $30,000 brick school building 

Source:

"Freeport's Public Schools." The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 23.1893, 20. Accessed August 9, 2018. https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/50389760/?terms=freeport%2Bpublic%2Bschool.

1894

  • (March 9) Formal opening of the new school located on the corner of Pine and Grove Streets

1895

  • Enrollment reached 445

1899

  • (October 11) High school grade formally began

1901

  • First high school class graduated

1902

  • A school census found 761 school-aged children in the district; up from 641 children in 1901

Source:

"Freeport's School Census." The Brooklyn Daily Eagle.  July 21, 1902, 9. Accessed May 23, 2019. https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/50412342/?terms=freeport%2Bschool%2B761.

1903 circa

  • Large addition added to school building costing approximately $30,000

1905

  • Class of 1905 chose red and white as the school colors

Source:

Deterling, William. "An Old Diary." The Student. April 1935, 12.

1907

  • New school building constructed at the corner of Ocean and Seaman Avenues

1908

  • The Tattler, a  weekly newspaper, was founded in 1908 by Freeport High School student James E. Stiles.  The newspaper focused on school news and events but was not an official publication of Freeport High School

Source:

Uhlan,Edward. Dynamo Jim Stiles: Pioneer of Progress. New York: Exposition Press, 1959.

1909

1910

  • The Girls' Athletic Association with the Help of the Board of Education were able to get a tennis court constructed on school grounds

Source:

"School Notes." Nassau County Review. June 17, 1910, 1.  Accessed October 29, 2018. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071433/1910-06-17/ed-1/seq-1/.

  • Students population by school: Seaman Avenue School, 259 pupils; Archer Street School, 225 pupils; Grove Street School, 519 pupils 

Source: 

"School Notes." Nassau County Review. September 9, 1910, 1. Accessed June 19, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071433/1911-05-05/ed-1/seq-1/.

  • (May 1910) Over a four week period, 125 students were absent due to an outbreak of measles

Source:

Freeport Board of Education Minutes, May 16, 1910.

1911

  • Superintendent Arthur E. Barnes fired from Freeport School District for sexual harassments allegations

See:

Barnes, Arthur E.

1912

  • Due to school overcrowding, many students placed on part-time schedules. Rooms rented in the Village to provide classroom space
  • Caroline G. Atkinson appointed acting school superintendent. She was the only female superintendent on Long Island

Source:

"Our School Superintendent." Nassau County Review. January 19, 1912, 8. Accessed July 26, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071433/1912-01-19/ed-1/seq-8/.

  • Blanche Trubenback, the only woman on the school board ballot, received only six votes in the May election.  She is the first woman in Freeport for run for school board

Source: 

"Freeport Cleans House, Too." The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. May 8, 1912. Accessed October 4, 2022. Newspapers.com.

1913

  • Moxey Rigby became the first African American to graduate Freeport High School

Click here for more information about Moxey Rigby.

1915

  • Columbus Avenue School constructed
  • Freeport BOE created the "Citizens Committee," comprised of seven taxpayers, to explore the creation of additional K-6 schools within the Freeport district and recommendations for the location of a high school building. The proposal to build a new school in the northeast section of Freeport was supported.  However, the idea to create a separate grade school for African American children, was thoroughly rejected

Sources:

"Important School Recommendations." Nassau County Review. July 4, 1913, 1. Accessed November 6, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071433/1913-07-04/ed-1/seq-1/.

"Protest Against Color Line." Nassau County Review. July 18, 1913, 1. Accessed November 4, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071433/1913-07-18/ed-1/seq-1/.

"To Report About School." Nassau County Review. June 27, 1913, 1. Accessed November 4, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071433/1913-06-27/ed-1/seq-1/.

1916

  • (June 30) - Former President William Howard Taft addressed graduates at the Freeport High School commencement exercises in the American Theatre

Source: 

"Ex-President Taft to the Graduates." Nassau County Review. June 30, 1916, 1. Accessed August 29, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071433/1916-06-30/ed-1/seq-1/.

1917

  • The Fire Council of the Freeport Fire Department agreed to use the fire whistle to alert students when th school would be closed due to "stormy weather"

Source:

"Fire Whistle to Aid School Children." The Nassau Review. January 19, 1917, 1.  Accessed July 2, 2018. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071433/1917-01-19/ed-1/seq-1/.

1918

  • Agnes Earon becomes first women elected to the school board

Source:

"Announces Candidacy for School Trustee of Freeport." The Nassau Post. April 12, 1918, 5. Accessed August 7, 2017. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071434/1918-04-12/ed-1/seq-5/.

  • Freeport's night school proposed teaching boat building

Source:

"Night School, to Teach Boat Building." Nassau County Review. February 1, 1918, 1. Accessed June 3, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071433/1918-02-01/ed-1/seq-1/.

1920 circa

  • Flashings, the Freeport High School newspaper, began

1921

  • Continuation classes started by the Board of Education for minors 14 and 15 years old who went to work before graduating.  Class took place on Saturdays between 8 a.m. and noon

1922

  • Freeport Cemetery chosen as the site for a new school building

1923 circa

  • Grove Street School overcrowding made it necessary for the district to use space in the neighboring Engine Company No. 1 firehouse, the Presbyterian Church, the Library, and YMCA

1924

  • New high School building on Pine Street dedicated

Source:

"Freeport to Dedicate Handsome High School on Monday Evening." The Nassau Daily Review. October 25, 1924, 1. Accessed May 2, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071431/1924-10-25/ed-1/seq-1/.

1925

  • Junior-Senior high school enrollment reaches 887

1925-1961

Source:

Dodd Retiring as Freeport School Head. Newsday. December 14, 1960, 30.

1928

  •  

1931

  • Cleveland Avenue School opened
  • Columbus Avenue School enlarged

1932

  • Roy Leon Smith, former principal of Freeport High School, died at his home in North Adams, MA.  He was 51 years old
  • Bronze marker erected on Main Street by the Exchange Club to commemorate the site of Freeport 's first school.  Teacher, Caroline G. Atkinson, unveiled the marker

Source:

"Will Mark Old Freeport School Site Tomorrow." The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 23, 1932, 2.  Accessed October 6, 2022. Newspapers.com.

1933

  • First known published usage of "Red Devils" to describe an athletic team from Freeport High School

Source:

Huley, Frank. "Freeport Beats Hempstead Hempstead with Final Spurt 18-15." Nassau Daily Review. December 18, 1933, 12.  Accessed August 7, 2018. fultonhistory.com

1935

  • Gold Star Mothers took the place of the Grand Army of Republic in the Memorial Day Parade

Source: "Gold Star Mothers Supplant G.A.R." The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 19, 1935, 9.  Accessed April 3., 2019. https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/53846245/?terms=%22gold%2Bstar%2Bmothers%22%2Bfreeport.

  • The Board of Education announced that Julia Grump, principal of Archer Street School, and Augusta Lovenguth, Principal of Columbus Avenue School would be replace by male administrators.  The board believed that once a school reached an enrollment of 500 students, men were better suited to be principals.  Protests from outraged women forced the board to rescind the plan

 

Sources:

"P-T. A. to Protest Removal of Two as School Heads,"  Nassau Daily Review. May 31, 1935, 1. Accessed November 15, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071428/1935-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/.

"Protests Change Plans of Board; Women Keep Jobs," Nassau Daily Review. June 20, 1935, 1. Accessed November 15, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071428/1935-06-20/ed-1/seq-20/.

1937

1941

  • Junior-Senior high school enrollment skyrocketed to 1,779. Grove Street Elementary School begins housing the 7th grade
  • School District publishes a 45 page booklet entitled The School Building Needs of Freeport, Long Island
  • Dr. Dodd re-elected president of the New York State Teachers Association
  • Willard W. Jones, principal of Archer Street School, entered the Army as a chaplain.  Dana H. Smith succeeded Jones
  • Bertha Hull, principal of Seaman Avenue School retired.  Lawrence C. Lobaugh succeed Hull
  • Helen E. Ross promoted principal of Columbus Avenue School after the retirement of Augusta M. Lovenguth

1941 circa

1946

  • (September) Freeport High School Fathers' Club was organized.  In 1947, the club reorganized and became the Freeport Fathers' and Boosters' Club of Freeport.

Source:

"E. White and Golden Get Sportsmanship Awards." The Leader. December 19, 1946, 1.  Accessed May 8, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071064/1946-12-19/ed-1/seq-1/.

"Fathers and Boosters of Schools Organize." The Leader. February 27, 1947, 6. Accessed May 8, 2019. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071064/1947-02-27/ed-1/seq-4/.

1948

1947

  • Budge vote for new schools in Northwest and South Area of Freeport 

Source:

Freeport BOE New Schools Proposition 

1949

  • Long Island Park Commission gives nine acres of land north of the Cleveland Avenue School to be used as athletic fields for Freeport High School
  • Atkinson School constructed. This school was named for Caroline G. Atkinson, a teacher with over 50 years of service in the school district

1950-1952

  • Seaman Avenue School used as temporary school housing for over-flow classes

1950

  • Freeport High School teachers K. Alice Hoerner and C. Sheard Parker died in a plane crash.  They were returning from summer vacation in upstate New York were they both had homes

1953

  • Buffalo Avenue Field House was constructed for the athletic field north of the Cleveland Avenue School

1960

  • Freeport High School constructed on the marshy land between the Village of Freeport and Baldwin

1961

  • (April 30) Dodd Middle School is dedicated

1962

  • (January 14) Leo F. Giblyn School dedicated

1963

  • Cleveland Avenue School was closed
  • Undefeated Freeport High School Football team wins the Rutgers Cup.  Bill Ashley retires as football coach after the winning season

Click here for more information about Bill Ashley

1964

  • Seaman Avenue School was converted to an administration building
  • Freeport-Roosevelt NAACP presented a citation to the Freeport School Board for their unanimous decision to eliminate racial imbalance in the Freeport Schools.  Dr. John Henry Martin, Freeport Superintendent, was awarded "Man of the Year," for his "contribution to the American Dream"

Source:

"Dr. Martin Man of the Year," The New York Amsterdam News." January 25, 1964, 22. Accessed November 25, 2022. ProQuest Historical African American Newspapers.

  • A technology based reading program, called the Edison Responsive Environment system, was introduced to 20 kindergarten students as a pilot project by the State Education Department

Source:

"Kids Learn to Read Without the Teacher," New York Amsterdam News. July 18, 1964, 21. Accessed November 25, 2022. ProQuest Historical African American Newspapers.

1965

  • Freeport leased classroom space from the First Presbyterian Church for 209 first and second graders while $60,000 in renovations were made to Archer Street School

Source:

"Church Leases Space to Archer School Students." The Leader. October 14, 1965, 13. Accessed June 1, 2018. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071064/1965-10-14/ed-1/seq-15/.

"Jewish Group Objects to Church-School Ties." Newsday. November 5, 1965, 15.

1966

  • In order to maintain racial balance, the Freeport School Board adopted a plan to conduct annual surveys of the racial makeup of the schools. Modification to the distribution of students amongst the schools was employed to maintain diversity. It was believed that Freeport was the first district to adopt such a policy on Long Island.  The plan was praised by the NYS Education Commissioner and Freeport-Roosevelt NAACP
  • Columbus Avenue School became the district's kindergarten center. This decision was made in order to correct the racial imbalance of the school.  At the time, Columbus Avenue School's enrollment was 66 percent African American

Source:

"Freeport's Racial Rx: Annual Checkup." Newsday. March 24, 1966, 4.

1966

  • (October 7) Fire burned the Grove Street School

1968

  • Sterling Keys elected to the Freeport School Board.  He was the first African American elected to the Freeport BOE

Source:

"Sterling Keys Wins School Board Post." The Leader.  The Leader., May 16, 1968, 1. Accessed November 6, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071064/1968-05-16/ed-1/seq-1/.

1969

  • Addition added to Freeport High School
  • Harding M. Morgan was hired as an assistant principal of Freeport High School.  He became one of the first African American administrators in the district.  He later was appointed principal of Dodd Junior High School

Sources:

"Former Dodd Principal Dies." The Leader. June 17, 1993, 11. Accessed November 9, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071065/1993-06-17/ed-1/seq-11/.

Mason-Draffen, Carrie. "Harding M. Morgan, Trailblazer for Black Educators," Newsday. June 11, 1993, 41. Accessed November 9, 2022.

  • 75 high school students from Freeport, Uniondale, and Hempstead took part in a 10-week African American history and cultural program at Hofstra University.  The Afro-American Winter Project was sponsored by Hofstra's Organization of Black Collegians

Source:

"75 Students Take Free Afro-American Lessons," Afro-American. February, 1969, 12. Accessed November 25, 2022. ProQuest Historical African American Newspapers.

  • In an effort to address racial tension in Freeport High School, Principal Albert Renken brought together a committee of 15 Black and 15 White students.  After a four-hour meeting, the students presented a list of recommendations that included: hiring of more African American teachers and guidance counselors and the teaching of Black history in all grades

Source:

Barrett, Brian. "Pupils Offer Biracial Plan," Newsday. January 24, 1969, 5.  Accessed November 25, 2022. Newspapers.com.

1970

  • Helmeted police officers were posted at the entrance of Freeport High School and Junior High School as a precautionary measure following a brief clash between police and students

Source:

"Helmeted Cops Ring Freeport High, Jr High," New York Amsterdam News. June 6, 1970.

1971

  • (April 21) March of Dimes, Nassau County Department of Health, and the Freeport Public Schools held an immunization clinic at Columbus Avenue School for rubella (German measles). Vaccinations for rubella became mandatory for New York State school children in 1970

Source:

Planning Immunization Day. The Leader. April 15, 1971, 14.  Accessed May 11, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071064/1971-04-15/ed-1/seq-14/.

  • The Black Educators Committee in Freeport was established by Harding M. Morgan. The purpose of this committee was to promote the hiring of black educators and to advocate for minority children

Sources:

"Former Dodd Principal Dies." The Leader. June 17, 1993, 11. Accessed November 9, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071065/1993-06-17/ed-1/seq-11/.

Mason-Draffen, Carrie. "Harding M. Morgan, Trailblazer for Black Educators," Newsday. June 11, 1993, 41. Accessed November 9, 2022.

1972

  • Freeport acquired the title "Math Capital of the United States"

Source:

"Freeport is Proud of its Mathletes." Newsday. Oct 13, 1972, 2A

 

  • George Emma was named athletic director of the Freeport School District

Source:

"George Emma Dies; Students and Adults Mourn." The Leader. May 19, 1983, 3. Accessed October 26, 2018. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071064/1983-05-19/ed-1/seq-3/.

1974

  • Freeport High School football team returned to Freeport Stadium after six years of playing at Hofstra University while the Stadium was undergoing renovations.

Source:

"FHS Football Back to Stadium." Village News. Freeport: NY. November 1974, 1.

  • (September 29) - John W. Dodd Junior High School, Phase I Addition Dedication

Source:

Dedication Program

  • The University of Liberia Choir performed in Freeport.  They attended classed and spent the night in the homes of members of the Freeport High School Chorus

Source:

Williams, Pat. "Suffolk Signs In," New York Amsterdam News. May 18, 1974, C2. Accessed November 25, 2022. ProQuest Historical African American Newspapers.

1975

  • Freeport High School junior, Lisa Tolliver, was the recipient of an Alpha Kappa Alpha Domestic Travel Grant award.  The award included a tour of several cities of historical interest to African Americans

Source: 

"Winner Travels on Tour," The New York Amsterdam News. July 16, 1975. Accessed November 25, 2022. ProQuest Historical African American Newspapers.

1978

  • Freeport High School's men's basketball team won the Nassau Class A title

Source:

"George Emma Dies; Students and Adults Mourn." The Leader. May 19, 1983, 3. Accessed October 26, 2018. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071064/1983-05-19/ed-1/seq-3/.

1988

  • Athletic field at Freeport High School was named in honor of George Emma

Source:

Benza, A. J. "Keening a Coach's Memory Alive." Newsday. January 3, 1988, 27.

1990

  • District celebrated its centennial

1993

  • Dual language program introduced in Freeeport schools

Sources:

Anzalone, Phillip J. "Dual Language Program Begins with a Lottery," The Leader.  July 16, 1993, 3. Accessed November 15, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071065/1993-07-15/ed-1/seq-3/.

Braine, William. "Freeport Schools Propose Dual Languages in Place of ESL." The Leader.  May 27, 1993, 3. Accessed November 15, 2022. http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn95071065/1993-05-27/ed-1/seq-3/.

 

1999

  • Flashings, Freeport High School's newspaper, fought censorship over an article it wanted to publish about the arrest of the track coach

2003

  • New Visions School of Exploration & Discovery, Freeport's first magnet school, opened

2007

  • The William "Bill" Ashley Memorial Sports Complex was dedicated at the Cleveland Avenue Field in Freeport

Source:

Freeport Report, November 2007.

2009

  • Archer Street celebrated 100th anniversary

2010

  • (October 6) Elinor Smith was awarded a Freeport High School Diploma posthumously

2015

  • Columbus Avenue School and Archer Street School are given historic roadside markers by the Freeport Landmarks Preservation Commission

2018

  • Freeport High School football team won the Long Island Conference One championship

2020-2021

2022

  • Harry Mohrman retired after 57 years of service as a physical education teacher and coach.  Mr. Mohrman beat Miss Atkinson's record of 52 years with the Freeport School District

Source:

Farghaly, Mohamed. "Superintendent's Day Conference Returns." Freeport Herald. September 15, 2022, 3.